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20121002
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
is still well above the national average. wolf. >> jim acosta joining us, thanks very much. let's dig deeper right now with our chief political analyst gloria borger. gloria, this unemployment number, the new number, how important is it to each of these two candidates? >> well, first of all it's got to be a real boost for president obama as jessica was talking about earlier. if not reality, then also a real psychological boost to get below that 8% figure. very important to them. because what it does, wolf, is it plays into the poll numbers that we've already been seeing, which is that people believe that things are getting better. the numbers are still not where the president wants them to be. but if it plays into a sense of optimism in this country, that's very good for the president. but overall you're going to hear the same refrain from both campaigns. the president's going to say that he's added more than 5 million jobs, and mitt romney's going to say there's still 23 million unemployed. >> you've spent a lot of time covering mitt romney. you did that excellent documentary all of
the jim lehrer detail on this. >> and your cantonist quoted as saying he never realized how difficult it would be to caricature furniture. he learned a new new lesson. >> interesting to see back to the poll numbers, we heard congressman ryan saying you get the -- no effect at all in that debate. i think -- >> we don't have the data yet. everyone is like -- >> waiting -- >> dying for the first poll. >> here's the thing. >> you're a pollster. >> that's right. here's the thing too. the last two minutes of anything, everybody here has spoken, you speak for a living. when you're told you have a two-minute close, that's got to be perfect, though. it's got to be devoid of any hesitation, perfect. you have to look at the man in the mirror and practice it, content, plan b, so i feel even there, there was a certain lacking. >> i thought the close was a metaphor for the 90 minutes. just like -- nothing there. >> the debates are all about expectations and after a disastrous debate you go into the next debate and people think he can't even talk now. the expectation theme in the next -- >> none of
and instead listen to substance. i appreciate the fact athat jim lehrer asked questions about substance. i appreciated that i was able to ask obama about obamacare. i asked, why is it that the middle class is still buried in this country? why we have millions of people out of work? why is it that half of our children coming out of college cannot find a job? why is it that when he took office, 32 million people are on food stamps? i asked him those questions. you heard his answers. as a result of those answers, the american people recognize that he and i stand for something very different. i will help the american people get good jobs and a bright future. [cheers and applause] even more importance than what was happening in the past was what he plans on doing for the future. he had the chance to describe his vision for the future. what it was was more of the same. he described a series of ideas that we have heard before. he talks about a stimulus and hiring more government workers and having the government making investments. of course, he talks about raising taxes. they plan to raise taxes
. in jim marshall, the new president of the institute of peace, which i am delighted to tell you, and i am pleased everyone is here for an import -- to hear about and the port project that has been sponsored by the institute for peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he has directed the center for democracy and civil studies -- civil society at georgetown. he -- he is a terrific asset for the institute. this project is driven by syrians, with technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and a sister institute in germany. it is important these efforts are driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states did not work all that well. we are pleased that you are here. i hope you have lots of questions, and if i can turn this over to you -- >> thank you para much, and let me add my welcome to you. we are delighted to see you here this morning. it will be an interesting conversation about syria after assad the challenges of managing a transition period as jim mentioned, the event this morning is in many ways a culmination of a project
, the jim demints, newt gingrich. there we see the pictures of all of them. and i wonder if that kind of helps play into the democrats' strategy a littl bit. >> absolutely. i mean, i think one of the things you saw right away was the real republican establishment taking a step away, saying they disavowed him. and right now what we're starting to see is some of the establishment types come back and say they really need missouri to win, but it really feeds into the democratic narrative that todd akin said what all of the other republicans think and just won't say it out loud. >> well, one of the things todd akin said when he made a decision to stay in this race, the strategy that beheard from inside his campaign was that he believed that since the republicans wanted to win control of the senate, he thought when push came to shove at the end, they would start putting money into this race. where does it stand right now? could he win? >> it's very tight. i mean, claire mccaskill is definitely up, but we're going to start seeing. i mean, right now, there's a lot of buys that are happening,
of it. obama cares on my list. i use that term respectfully. i'm sorry, jim, i'm going to stop the subsidies to pbs. i like pbs and big bird and i like you, too, but i'm not going to keep spending money on things i have to borrow money to pay for it. martha: big bird woke and heard that. users posted 17,000 big bird tweets a minute. one such account @firedbigbird. bill: a year ago in a conversation with governor romney he said when i get one-on-one in the president he's going to say x and i'll say y. he will say "a" and i'll say "b." that was a year ago. he has been waiting a year. if you look at these snap polls. oftentimes this is an emotional reaction. whether it's cbs or cnn there was a clear winner in this debates. martha: governor romney had take and lot of heat from conservative watchers of all of this who said he had yet to make a passionate conservative argument throughout the course of this campaign. i think those folks will be satisfied with what they saw last night. he was ago that and connected to what he was saying. he made his points. and he turned that key in a
of our history which imposed specific burdens on members of our society. slavery, racism, jim crowe. they will had impacts. lbj in the '60s is saying how do we move forward? you can't let the shackles down and think we have equality. you have to work to make equality. that's where the concept was rooted initially. >> this notion though of a reparation or repair tiff as foekt affirmative action goes away in michigan. the michigan cases which are ultimately up for debate now, tell us about those. >> absolutely. there are two rationales under the constitution, one is the immediate -- the other one is the diversity rationale. there's been a movement away from the remedial rationale towards the diversity rationale. harvard law professor says it's a better move because it makes people, minority groups, look like they are burying gifts rather than grievances which this language that i love. like she does, i feel like we've moved too far from the remedial aspiration. but you're exactly right. once we get to the michigan case, 2003 case we have the diversity rationale being asserted by the u
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)